Documento senza titolo Welcome! Today
Documento senza titolo
   
 














Documento senza titolo


APOSTOLIC VICARIATE OF ANATOLIA

Apostolicus Vicariatus Anatoliensis

Birth of the Vicariate

The Apostolic Vicariate of Anatolia was erected on Dıicember 15, 1990 transforming the giuridical state of the Mission Sui Iuris of Trebisona and ıncorporatıng a part of the Apostolic Vicariate of Istanbul.  In this territory there were also present two Apostolic Prefecturates: that of Syria and that of Mardin. For our Vicariate we must speak more exactly of Oriental Anatolia in so far as in  Western Anatolia the Archdiocese of Izmir and the Apostolic Vicariate of Istanbul are also present  (see the map below). These ecclesiatial territories are connected with the Church in the Latin-Roman rite. The first Cathedral Church chosen was Mersin and in 1999 the Church of Iskenderun has taken its place as Cathedral.

Christianity in the Vicariate

We can rightly say that the first presence of Christianity in the Vicariate came with the first followers of Christ in the city of Antioch (37 a.D.) It was here that for the first time they were called “Christians”. Two great figures for the beginnings of Christianity were born here: Saint Paul at Tarsus and Luke the evangelist at Antioch. From this time on Christianity remained uninterrupted up to our day. The principal languages spoken by the Christians of western Anatolia were Greek, Armenian and Syriac (we could say a form of the Aramaic dialects spoken by Jesus). Because of the cultural-linguistic differences the Armenian Church of the V century and the Syrian Church, so called Jacobite, in the VI century became autonomous from the rest of the Church already diffused in all of the Roman Empire, where one spoke Latin in the east and Greek in the west, and also beyond these confines.
From 1054 the Christians of Anatolia, (those of the Greek language), became autonomous from the authority of the Pope who lived in Rome and was the most well known in the world of the Latin language. For this reason these Christians of Anatolia were called Greek-Orthodox (some under the authority of the Patriarch of Constantinople, today Istanbul, and others under that of Antioch). The Catholics , that is those who recognized the authority of the Pope, nevertheless returned in being present in western Antioch for various needs: first to support those going on pilgrimages to Jerusalem, again because of the shipments which they made in some western reigns (see the formation of Principates of Antioch or Empires of Trabzon) and besides for professional and commercial reasons. At the Council of Florence (1439) it was decided to try to reunite Catholics and Orthodox, but this decision did not succeed. Also after the fall of the Roman Empire of the West (1453), some Religious came also to Western Anatolia in order to try to unite all the Christians and to witness their faith to those who did not have any.

In about the XVII century, a part of the Catholics from here went to form the Catholic Church of Armenia, others went to form the Syro-Catholic Church, others the Greek Orthodox (so called Melichite), others to the Chaldean Church according to the languages and cultures. All of them acknowledged the primacy of the Pope. It was different with the Christians called Maronites who have always felt attached to the Pope but instead using a different liturgy.
In any case, be it in the Selcukien reign or in that of the Ottoman Empire, advanced research proves that in Anatolia there were diverse centres where the majority of the population were Christians.
The Latin Catholics were present in colonial quarters: those from Genoa and those from Venice. At Trabzon from the time of Justinian, they started to arrive in Anatolia and after that there was the increase of commercial and cultural exchange between these peoples and Europe (the 8th century constitutes the boom of the immigration). Their descendents are called Levantines. Having knowledge of these communities in Anatolia, priests and religious decided to follow them to help give them both religious and scholastic assistance. The first Latin Mission was had from the XVI century. The first ecclesiastical circumscription was erected in 1818: “Archdiocese of Izmir and Apostolic Vicariate of Asia Minor”.
The XIX century was alive and rich in activities and works by the Catholics and by other Christians of Anatolia. Through these groups the Ottoman and European world were in close contact. But something broke in the balance of the sharing. At the end of the XIX century because of the nationalist ideology, which involved so many peoples, the Christians of Armenian origin underwent a drastic reduction. But in 1914, the outbreak of the First World War, forced many Catholics, especially the French ones, to return to their country.
In the years between 1915 -1918 it was the Armenians and the Syrians to undergo a real and personal Jihad with deportations ecc (this position is held by the historian, Andrea Riccardi of the St Egidio Community, Nobel Prize Winner for Peace). After this the Armenians (Catholics and non) in Western Anatolia were aware of a brusque diminution up to almost disappearing even to our day. Part of this population must have saved their lives going to form the so called Armenian diaspora. In a similar process the Christian Syriac community was involved. In the years 1022-23 it was the Christians of Greek ethnic groups who had a real downfall.
The war of liberation which brought to form the new Turkish Republic cost the Greeks a great scale destruction of their religious-cultural traditions in Anatolia. In 1935 the change of population between Greece and Turkey gave way to a process of diminution of Christians of Greek ethinic groups, a process which did not cease even up to our day.
In 1935 a law delivered a blow to the Levantines who were working on small trades. Only the Turkish people could continue to be craftsmen, blacksmiths etc. The greater part of the Catholic foreigners were forced to immigrate, notwithstanding that many of them for generations had lived in the country.
Besides this the new political situation brought various Churches to recognize the confıscatıon (Tarso Giresun…), the expulsion (Zonguidak…) or even the destruction (Merzifon…). Many of the Churches were converted into mosques, libraries or other buildings. The same sort will happen also to other Christian buildings such as schools, hospitals ecc. Buildings which they camouflaged in their architettonic aspect, in their dates (Urgup…) etc. were destroyed or demolıshed.
The Second World War instead will bring to Western Anatolia the complete disappearance of the Levantines with the consequent closing of various Consolates (Samsun which counted 13 Consolates today has only one). The formation of the various American bases on the Turkish territory allowed the Catholic Church to continue to remain notwithstanding the difficulties. In this way also the Christians of diverse rites of the Oriental Churches were left without any spiritual assistance, so they attended the Latin Catholic Church (one of the few Catholic Churches remaining in Anatolia). The development of technology, and perhaps also of the particular political situation, made certain that some of these American bases were closed. With the diminuition of foreigners of Christian origin, diverse Muslim families approached Christianity and some of them have even been baptized. Some of these had grandparents who were Christians but to save their lives, they had hidden their original faith. The social pressures, nevertheless, did not render the passing into Christianity very easy. We mention latest killings of Christians among whom is our own Italian priest, don Andrea Santoro. After all these difficult happenings we can understand how our Apostolic Vicariate of Roman Latin rite, situated entirely in Turkey and extending about 400,000 square kilometers with a total of over 30 million inhabitants, can have only 0.05% Christians (the percentage is even less if one counts only Catholics). Our statistics for these past years, quoting the Pontifical Yearbook are the following:

Year
Catholics
(unofficial)
Priests
dioces - relig
Catholics x priest.

Deacons
perm.

Religious
men - women

Parisches
1999
3.000
1
6
429
1
8
10
6
2000
4.500
5
6
409
1
8
10
6
2001
4.500
4
6
450
1
8
10
6
2002
4.500
7
6
346
1
8
12
6
2003
4.550
3
6
506
1
7
12
6
2004
4.550
4
6
455
1
7
11
6
2005
4.550
2
5
650
0
7
9
6
2006
4.550
2
5
650
0
6
9
6
2007
4.550
1
5
758
0
6
9
6

Our parishes have the care of Catholics of other rites who do not any longer have a Church of their own (Chaldeans, Armenians, Maronites, Syro-Catholics and Melechites) and sometimes also of Orthodox, of ancient Christian Oriental Churches and of Protestants. Our Vicariate has passed through a very painful time with the murder of Don Andrea Santoro at Trabisonda (Trabzon) on February 5, 2005.  Don Santoro was a priest from Rome of fidei donum.

Our Bishops

1993-2004 Ruggero Franceschini O.F.M. Cap.
2004- Luigi Padovese O.F.M. Cap.

Ruggero Franceschini: born on September 1st 1939 at Saltino of Prignano on the Secchia (MO). He entered the Seminary of Scandiano (RE) as an adolescent and at 16 years of age received the Capuchin habit (Fidenza September 27 1955). He made his First Profession on October 4th 1956 and Solemn Profession on September 25th 1960. He was ordained priest on August 11th, as a Capuchin Friar in the Religious province of Parma. He continued his studies and got his degree at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome, and then at the Catholic University of Milano. He then dedicated his life to teaching. In his province he was superior for several years (1979-1985 and 1990-1993). On July 2nd 1993 he was appointed Apostolic Vicar of Anatolia and titular Bishop of Sicilibba. Ordained Bishop on October 3rd of the same year. He was then appointed Archbishop of Izmir on October 11th, 2004.

Luigi Padovese:  born in Milano on March 31st, 1947. On the 4th of October 1965 he made first profession  with the Capuchins and exactly 3 years later made solemn profession.  On June 16th, 1973 he was ordained to the priesthood.  He was titular professor with the seat in Patrology at the Pontifical University Antonianum.  Before he was ordained Bishop he had been for well over 16 years the president of the Franciscan Institute of Spirituality of the same University.  He was also an invited Professor at the Pontifical Gregorian University as well as at the Pontifical Academy Alfonsianum.   For 10 years he was the Apostolic Visitor of the Oriental Colleges in Rome for the Congregation of the Oriental Churches.  He was also consultant of the Congregation for the Cause of Saints.  On October 11th 2004 he was appointed Apostolic Vicar  of Anatolia and titular Bishop of Monteverde.   He was consecrated at Iskenderun on November 7th of the same year.

Mission of Syria.  Apostolic Prefecturate

The Churches on the south of the Vicariate were from the very beginning under the Apostolic Administration of Syria. It was Father Giuseppe Leclerc du Tremblay (French Capuchin and councillor of Cardinal Richelieu… from the color of his clothing he was so-called “grey Eminence”) who worked assiduously so that it would become the Mission of the Capuchins in Syria and because it was to be entrusted to the French Capuchins.
Hence from 1625 the first Missionaires were invited from Brittany and from Tours, two Religious Provinces extending from the Province of Paris, which was too numerous and extensive, hence the division. In 1627 the Friars cooperated also for the mission of Mesopotamia and Persia.j That same year Father Michele of Rennes opened the Mission in the city of Damascus, helped by the Console of Venice. Through them some Bishops of the Oriental Churches united with the Catholic Church.
In 1629 Fr Macario of Gien opened a residence in Tripoli, and in 1695 another was opened a Gazir, in 1715 in Salimae. Later in 1728, the Mission of the Capuchins in Syria was entrusted to the sole Province of Brittany thus making it a Custody. The main residence and the center of the Mission was at Saida (Sidone).
The Mission gradually went to the care of the Italian Capuchins in 1789 because of the social unrest and disorder caused by the new spirit of the French Revolution. The missionaries distinguished themselves by setting up ‘colleges’ for boys and girls teaching them to do translation and printing work in the Arabic language. Some of the works were on: the bible, hagiography, as well as scientific and literary works (cfr. Syria, in Lexicon Capuccinum. pp. 1661-1663).
Later, as a flowering of these initiatives, the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda Fide erected the Mission of Syria (Custody of Italian Capuchins ) as an Apostolic Prefecture in 1817.
After the expulsion of Missionaries of Mesopotania in 1830, the house at Aleppo was also aggregated to the Prefecture (the house was founded in 1625 and from here were founded also three houses at Cyprus). The Discalced Carmelites came into the territory of the Prefecture shortly after, firstly in Aleppo and then in Alessandretta (Iskenderun).  

1789 ITALIAN CUSTODY OF SYRIA BY THE CAPUCHINS

1793-1808

Fr. Giustiano da Freignes

Superior

1808-1829

Fr. Angelico da Loreto

Superiorr, From 1817 Prefect

1830 UNION OF ALEPPO WITH THE PREFECTURE OF SYRIA

1829-1834

Fr. Francesco da Ploaghe

Prefect

  Fr. Francesco da Genova Viceprefetto ad Aleppo (1830)
1834-1841 Fr. Modesto da Onano Prefect
  Fr. Giuseppe da Genova Viceprefetto ad Aleppo
1841 TRANSFER OF THE CENTRAL SEAT AT ALEPPO
1841-1844 Fr. Giuseppe da Genova Prefect
...    
1883-1896 Fr. Emanuele della Croce Prefect
1896-1902 Fr. Marcellino da Vallarsa Superior
1902-... Fr. Geronimo da Lugduno Superior

In 1991 the Italian Friars recalled the French Friars because of the difficulties and problems caused by the various suppressions. On March 7th 1902, when there were no more Italian Missionaries, the Custody of Syria was entrusted, by the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda Fide, to the Capuchins of the Province of Lyons. The Custody at that time had the following residences: Beirut (1626), Abey (1648), Antiochia (1846), Mersina (1854), Koderbek (1889), Tarsus and Bagdad (1892) and three houses on the island of Cyprus. Shortly after this the Jesuit Fathers came to Adana.
It was only when in 1938 Hatay passed from Syria to Turkey that Monsignor Roncalli obtained the Pontifical Seal in December 1939 that the Churches of the regions of Cilicia (Mersin, Tarsus and Adana) and of Hatay (Antioch and Iskenderun) were placed under the Apostolic Vicariate of Istanbul (for the Vicariate the Latin Catholics were administered by the Vatican Apostolic Delegate who then resided at Istanbul and shortly after at Ankara).
On January 1st 1963 the Lebanese Capuchins gave Mersin and Antioch to the care of the Province of Parma already present at the Black sea, at Istanbul and at Izmir. Again in 1968 the Capuchins of Parma replaced the Jesuits at Adana and in 1984 the Carmelites of Iskenderun.
In 1975 with the creation of the Vicariate of Istanbul for the Latin Catholics, there was entrusted to the same Vicariate the care of Anatolia of the south and it became then detached from the jusisdiction of the Nunciature which was then transferred to Ankara. Con la creazione del Vicariato dell'Anatolia il Vicariato di Costantinopoli fu chiamato di Istanbul.

Apostolic Prefecture of Mardin

Following the caravan guide the Capuchins of Syria open in Mesopotamia (XVII Century), the residences of Diyarbakir (Amida) in 1667 and at Mardin (Marida) in 1684 and then at Edessa (Urfa). These places were under the custody of the French Capuchins but in 1737 a Mardin the Discalsced Carmelites succeeded them. In 1808 Fr Joseph of Poirino came to Dlyarbakr because the French Capuchins were undergoing the consequences of the French Revolution. He was expulsed ten years later as well as his successors so much so that in 1830 the station of Diyarbakir remained empty.
But on August 30 1842 Propaganda Fide, finding help from the Spanish Capuchins erected the Apostolic Prefecture of Mardin detaching it from that of Syria, and naming Fra Joseph of Burgos as Prefect. Hence in 1843 the brothers could return to Diyarbakir. On September 11th 1845 Fra Joseph of Burgos died a Tokat (already Commano ın the Ponto). .The duty of Prefect went to the President of the Hospice of Mardin, Fra Nicola of Barcellona (November 23rd 1845).
In 1846 3 Italian Capuchins came to the support of the Spanish Friars. Therefore, they were able to open the missions of Orfae in 1848, Birecik in 1862, Malatya (once Metilene) and Harput in 1863,Mezéré (Mamouret-ul-Aziz) in 1868 and to these followed Elaziğ and other cities outside the confines of our actual Vicariate.

   
1842

ERECTION OF THE PREFECTURE AT MESOPOTAMIA (30 AUGUST)

1842-1845

P. Giuseppe da Burgos

Prefect

1845-1873

P. Nicola da Barcellona

Prefect

1873-1879

P. Donato da Guardiagrele

Prefect

1879-1909 P. Giannatonio Zucchetti da Milano Prefect

To help the Friars in Syria as well as those at the Black Sea, there were always diverse Religious Congregations of Sisters who collaborated for the running of schools, dispensaries for the poor, hospitals etc.


The Latin Circumscription after the suppression of the Prefecturate (1896)

Apostolic Prefecturate and Mission “Sui Iuris” of the Black Sea

The city of Trabzon (Trebisonda) on the Black Sea knew the presence of Latin Catholics before many other cities of Anatolia. In fact in 1314 the people from Genoa who conquered it imposed on the authorities to accept in the city a Latin Bishopric and the presence of two convents: for the Franciscans and for the Dominicans. They also succeeded for the construction of many other Churches. With the downfall of the Empire, though, these building were changed into mosques while others were destroyed. It was only with the expulsion of the Capuchins from Georgia that the Catholic Religious were able to return to Trabzon (Trebisonda).
Before the formation of the Apostolic Vicariate of Anatolia, the territory in the north was the mission of the Capuchin Friars and had been elevated to an Apostolic Prefecture on March 13th, 1845 (called the Apostolic Prefecture of Trabzon). At Trabzon there were soon aggregated other houses: Samsun, Inebolu, Erzurum, Sinop, Giresun and Ordu.


Latin Ecclesiatical Circumsription of 1845.

The Prefecture was about a thousand kilometers long and from 150 to 200 kilometers wide. In 1856 the Capuchin Missionaries founded houses even beyond the territory of the Prefecture: in Bulgaria (Varna and Burgas) and in Rumania (Costance).
Depending firstly on the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda Fide, the Apostolic Prefecture of the Black Sea then was passed on to the Congregation for the Affairs of Oriental Rite and then again to the Sacred Congregation for Oriental Churches. In the meantime, from being a Prefecture it became a simple mission (not Sui Iuris), in virtue of the Decree Excelsum (September 12th, 1896), which abolished the “Prefectures of the Apostolic Missions from the Oriental Churches between the confines of other Missions or Dioceses and not having in this way a proper territory” (hence, the mission found itself as part of the Vicariate of Constantinople).
The Commissariate of the Orient was suppressed in 1913, the Trapezuntine Mission was entrusted to the Province of Palermo and in 1927 to that of Parma (May 3rd). From that time on the Capuchin’s Missin of Trebisonda would comprise also the Mission Station of Yeşilköy (Istanbul), Buca and Bayrakli (Mission of Izmir) and also the Mission of Uşak (1920). Because the number of Catholics of Oriental Rite had become very scanty, the Capuchins were the only ones left for the people of Latin Rite.
For this reason on June 20th, 1931 the Mission was detached from the Apostolic Vicariate of Constantinople and erected in Mission “Sui Iuris” called Trapezuntina, depending directly on the Congregation of Propaganda Fide and from 1938 it was passed on to the Congregation for Oriental Churches. At the very beginning the superior resided at Samsun. Under this Mission the station of Zongudak was also incorporated directed by the Assumption Fathers.There were many Christians there then.. The following is the succession of the Superiors of this historic Mission.

1845

APOSTOLIC PREFECTURE (SINCE MARCH 13)

1845-1852

Fr. Damiano d Viareggio

Prefect

1852-1881

Fr. Filippo Maria da Bologna

Prefect

1881-1911

Fr. Eugenio da Modica

Prefect. From 1896 Superior

1911-1922

Fr. Lorenzo da Montemarciano *

Superior

1923-1927

Fr. Michele da Capodistria

Superior

1931

THE MISSION “SUI IURIS” WITHPONTIFICAL BRIEF (JUNE 20)

1931-1933

Fr. Michele da Capodistria

Ecclesistical Superior

1933-1955

Fr. Giovanni Giannetti da Fivizzano

Ecclesistical Superior (Mar. 9)

1955-1961

Fr. Prospero Germini da Ospitaletto

Ecclesistical Superior

1961-1966

Fr. Michele Salardi da Novellara **

Ecclesistical Superior

1966-1983

Fr. Giuseppe (Germano) Bernardini

Ecclesistical Superior (Dec 19)

1983-1993

S.E.R. Mons. Giuseppe Bernardini

Archbishop of Izmir (Jan 22)

1990

APOSTOLIC VICARIATE OF ANATOLIA (AS OF JULY 2)

* From 1920 to 1923 (March 7th) being Apostolic Administrator at Izmir he was represented by Fr Cirillo Zohrabiar of Erzurum.
** Fr Michele being at Buca (Izmir) he was represented on the Black Sea, residing at Trebisonda by Fr Germano of Verica (1961-1963) and by Fr Tarcisio of Verica (October 18th 1963 – 1966).

In 1985 the Capuchins from Reggio Emilia gave up the Mission “Sui Uris” of Trebisonda which then went to the administration of the Archbishop of Izmir.


Latin Ecclesiastical Circumscription from 1939 to 1990.

The Religious of the Apostolic Vicariate

The Congregations of male religious of our Vicariate are:

  • Capuchin Friars:  Dıyarbakır (1667), Mardin (1684), Urfa (1839), Tarso (1844-1943), Trebisonda (1845-1983), Samsun (1846-1984), Inebolu e Antioch (1846), Sinop (1848), Erzurum (1852), Mersin (1855), Amasya (1860-1908), Giresun (1887), Ordu (1895), Kastamonu. Today they are only at Mersin and Antioch (from being 10, there are today only  4 Capuchins).
  • Marist Brothers: present at Samsun (from 1895) and at Mersin (1905 with 3 brothers) up untıll the beginning of the first world war (1914).
  • Assumptionists:  these Fathers were present in Zonguldak from 1896 until 1957 (this city is no longer a part of the Vicariate now but it was part of the Mission “Sui Juris”  of Trebisonda).  Expelled at the time of the first World War (1914-1918) their mission was held on to by the Capuchin Fathers.  The Assumptionists have been present in Kayseri (1903-1908) and at Nevşehir (1908 – 1914).
  • Brothers of Christian Schools: were at Iskenderun, Trebisonda (1875) and Iskenderun.
  • Mekhitarists: Trebisonda (1878).
  • Salesians:  were present here with a priest for some years at Adana (1997-2001) and Iskenderun (2000--2003).
  • Jesuits:  this Order was at Adana until 1968.  They had a college at Kayseri.  At Merzifon they had a Church but it was burnt in 1921. They had to leave Amasya (where they had succeeded the Capuchins in 1908), Tokat, Sivas (Sebaste).
  • Discalced Carmelites: they succeeded the Capuchins at Mardin (1737), Iskenderun (1858-1984), Beylan (1866).
  • Little Brothers of Jesus:  these Brothers have a brother at Antioch from 1967 approximately.
  • Conventual Friars: at Iskenderun since 2004 (2 priests for a brief period and there has also been a lay brother).

With  regard to women religious there are or have been:

  • Francıscan Sisters of Lons-le-Saunier: Mardin (1882), Diarbakir (1882), Urfa (1884).
  • Sisters of St Joseph of the Apparition:  present from the end of the XIXth century at Samsun (until 1914), Trabzon, Giresun (1902), Iskenderun, Mersin (from 1887 to 1914), Erzurum (arrived there before 1881), Sinop, Antioch (until 1938).
  • Sisters of St. Joseph of Lyons: Adana.
  • Sisters Terziarie di St. Francesco: Trabzon (1869).
  • Domenican Sisters: Van.
  • Daughters of the Church:  at Tarsus since 21 September 1994 (3 sisters).
  • Little Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Parma:  at Adana from June 1996, with the exception of 2005 (one sister for some time 2 sisters).
  • Carmelite Sisters:  2 sisters at Iskenderun until 1999.
  • Sisters of Charity of Sts B. Capitanio e V. Gerosa (Suore di Maria Bambina):  at Iskenderun sınce 24 settembre (3 sisters).

For some years then, there was a sister from the Order of Virgins from the diocese of Milano (at Antioch) and the actual secretary of the Bishop is a Missionary Franciscan Sister of the Immaculate Conception.  Besides these there are three missionary families (two Italian and one Romanian since 1994).  Mons. Franceschini had a permanent deacon who was Italian and who went with him to his Archdiocese of Izmir.

Development of the Vicariate of Anatolia

The formation of the Apostolic Vicariate of Anatolia had been decided upon since 1990 but its first Bishop was consecrated only in 1993.  The administration ‘pro tempore’ was entrusted to Mons. Bernardini, then Archbishop of Izmir.  He solemnly consecrated the Church of Mersin proclaiming it a Cathedral (a stone at the entrance of the Church records the event) and named Father Gregory Simonelli his Vicar General.  On November 1st 1999 Monsignor Ruggero Franceschini transferred the seat to Iskenderun  given to him by the Capuchin Fathers. Mersin has since then become the “concathedral.
At the end of the nineties a house was purchased in Cappadocia in the village of Avanos for the prayer life and for a place of rest of priests and religious. Recently we have been forced to abandon it. From that time on, however, up until today the Brothers of St Valentine continue their hidden prayer in Cappadocia, an area rich in Christian witness, in the city of Uçhisar. From 2000 to 2003 don Andrea Santoro was present in the city of Edessa (Urfa) and for a short time a priest and a sister are present again in the Church of Mardin.

 



L'emblema
dell'attuale Vescovo


SOMMARIO


Birth of the Vicariate

The History of Christianity in the Vicariate of Anatolia

Our Bishops

The Ancient Apostolic Prefectures of the Vicariate
Prefectures of Syria Prefectures of Mardin
Prefectures of the Black Sea

Our Religious

Gli sviluppi del Vicariato



The Church of Giersun
today a library


THE LATIN CATHOLIC CHURCHES OF THE VICARIATE YESTERDAY AND TODAY

Adana
Antakya
Biylan
Erzurum
Güzelyayla
Iskenderun
Kayseri
Malatya
Mersin
Merzifon
Nevşehir
Ordu
Samsun
Sinop
Sivas
Tokat
Trabzon
Tarsus
Urfa
Zonguldak


Don Andrea Santoro


I PROTAGONISTI

Andrea Santoro
Angelico da Smirne
Basilio da Barco
Basilio da Novara
Benigno Caselli
Damiano da Viareggio
Francec.da Scandiano
Gregorio Simonelli
Pio da Sarno
Giuseppe Du Tremblay
Giovanni da Fivizzano
Giuseppe Bernardini
Lorenzo da Montemar.
Luigi Padovese
Michele da Capodist.
Roberto Ferrari
Ruggero Franceschini
ecc.



P. Basilio Bertolini da Barco, cappuccino costruttore della chiesa
di Mersin e per 22 anni suo parroco, prima di essere stato per 18 anni nella missione del Mar Nero


P. Roberto Ferrari missionario cappuccino in Turhcia da più di
50 anni


ORDINI RELIGIOSI
NEL VICARIATO
IERI E OGGI>

Assunzionisti
Cappuccini
Carmelitani
Domenicani
Fr. delle Scuole Crist.
Gesuiti
Maristi
Mechitaristi
ecc.

Carmelitane
Figlie della Chiesa
Sr.di San Giuseppe
ecc.


Il nostro Vesocov
con il Papa


Ruggero Franceschini
primo Vicario Apostolico
dell'Anatolia

Luigi Padovese
attuale Vicario Ap.






















































































































































































Giuseppe Bernardini
primo vescovo latino
cattolico a ritornare
in questo territorio


P. Lorenzo
da Montemarciano
IV superiroe
della Missione

 


Katolik Kilisesi
Yenisehir Mah. Mithat
Paşa Cad. No. 5 - PK 75
31201 Iskenderun, Turkey

Tel: +90 326 6175916
Fax: 613 92 91